Physics

2014-15 General Catalog

211 Interdisciplinary Sciences Building
(831) 459-3744
http://physics.ucsc.edu/

Faculty | Course Descriptions


Program Description

Physics seeks to discover the fundamental regularities or “laws” that govern our universe and to apply these laws to explain the behavior of fundamental and complex systems. The same underlying principles describe the behavior of atoms, lasers, living cells, and galaxies. Physics is, therefore, at the base of all modern science and technology, and, even at an elementary level, this fundamental nature can be appreciated.

The Physics Department offers majors in physics, physics (astrophysics), applied physics, and physics education. These programs prepare students for graduate work in physics, astrophysics, and astronomy, for engineering and other technical positions in industry, and for careers in education. With appropriate courses in other disciplines, these majors provide excellent preparation for advanced study in technical subjects such as biology, chemistry, engineering, geophysics, and the philosophy of science. The applied physics major is excellent preparation for positions in industry directly upon graduation.

Faculty are approachable to work with students in  both formal and informal settings. All undergraduate physics majors have the opportunity to work individually with a faculty member in completing the senior thesis requirement.

The main areas of physics research at UCSC are the study of fundamental particles and interactions (high-energy physics), the study of condensed matter physics, astrophysics/cosmology, and biophysics.

Efforts in high-energy physics are aided by the presence of an organized research unit, the Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics (SCIPP). The SCIPP experimentalists play significant roles in experiments at some of the major accelerator laboratories in the world, including the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford University and the European centers Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). SCIPP experimentalists have also played an important role in creating the major satellite for gamma-ray astronomy, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, are involved in the Dark Energy Survey, and conduct a thriving particle astrophysics program detecting TeV gamma rays as part of the UC VERITAS collaboration. SCIPP theorists are active in the phenomenology of high-energy particle interactions, including dark matter models, the theory of strong and electroweak interactions, electroweak symmetry breaking and Higgs bosons, theories of supersymmetry, superstrings, and gravity. SCIPP also maintains a vigorous program in particle astrophysics including research in high-energy astrophysics, dark matter, formation of galaxies and large-scale structure in the universe, and theories of cosmology and the very early universe. SCIPP is also home to a research program in experimental biophysics, exploiting instrumentation technologies developed in other areas of physics for the study of functional organization and development of neural systems in a variety of living organisms. In addition, there is closely related research in biomedical applications such as retinal prosthesis.

The presence of the strong astrophysics group from the Astronomy and Astrophysics Department in the same building provides a healthy symbiosis in this area. Note that the Astronomy and Astrophysics Department does not offer an undergraduate major. UCSC is the headquarters for the University of California Observatories, which include Lick Observatory near San Jose and the Keck Observatory in Hawaii; these provide additional opportunities for collaboration between researchers in physics and astronomy.

Condensed matter physics research at UCSC covers a range of topics including the behavior of exotic many-electron systems (for example, superconductors); the study of magnetic phase transitions; the organization of complex systems (proteins, DNA, and polymers); and the development of new electronic devices using novel materials and research in biophysics.

The experimental program uses X-ray and synchrotron radiation techniques at facilities such as the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL); neutron scattering techniques at various national laboratories; and optical, X-ray, and specific heat techniques at UCSC. Undergraduate students are actively involved in several condensed matter physics laboratories.

Courses

An undergraduate physics education is broad, yet fundamental. Undergraduate students, even in introductory classes, are exposed to new ideas associated with explorations at the boundaries of human knowledge.

The lower-division introductory courses in the major programs (Physics 5A, 5B, 5C, and 5D sequence) are well suited to students in the physical sciences and engineering. The 6A, 6B, 6C sequence, which also provides a calculus-based introduction to the basic concepts in physics, is better suited to students in the life sciences. Students who take Physics 6A instead of Physics 5A, and do very well in it, may contact the department chair for permission to enter the major. The laboratory courses, 5L-5M-5N and 6L must be taken concurrently with the corresponding lecture courses.

Major Program

The physics, astrophysics, and applied physics major programs provide a comprehensive coverage of the field and the background necessary for graduate school or industrial careers. The physics education major provides the necessary background to enter a rigorous credential program and, ultimately, a career in high-school science education. Students earn a bachelor of science (B.S.) degree. The UCSC physics, astrophysics, applied physics, and physics education programs begin with a four-quarter presentation of the introductory concepts of the subject, Introduction to Physics. (Note: the applied physics program also requires completion of a general chemistry course.)  In order for a student to finish the UCSC physics program in four years, it is essential to start Introduction to Physics at the beginning of the first year.

This is followed by courses which provide an introduction to relativity and quantum physics. The programs continue with a three-quarter sequence in mathematical methods of physics designed to provide the mathematics preparation necessary for most of the upper-division physics courses required for the majors. Included in the upper-division programs are two intensive laboratory courses designed to illustrate both historical experiments in the development of physics, astrophysics, and applied physics, and modern experimental methods. Advanced and especially motivated students may enroll in some graduate courses with the approval of the instructor and department chair

The senior thesis, required of all physics, astrophysics, applied physics, and physics education majors at UCSC, provides the opportunity for students to apply their skills to problems of interest to them, either theoretical or experimental, usually with technical advice from a faculty member. The senior thesis may be based on research with a faculty member. The senior thesis is a distinctive part of the UCSC physics major program and entails a substantial investment of both student and faculty time. The learning experience involved in the thesis, as well as the thesis itself, has proven extremely valuable to students in enhancing employment opportunities upon graduation or in gaining admission to graduate school.

The physics education major is designed to provide future K-12 physics and mathematics teachers with the necessary coursework aligned with the K-12 physics and mathematics standards necessary to pass the California Subject Matter Examinations for Teachers (CSET) in Physics and Mathematics. It also includes a thorough introduction to educational theory and practice including a sequence of three classroom-based internships. Students will be well prepared to enter a rigorous teaching credential program and ultimately a career in high school education. The senior comprehensive requirement involves a curriculum development project overseen by the Physics/Astronomy faculty, with co-supervision from CalTeach/Education faculty as needed.

Disciplinary Communication (DC) Requirement

Students of every major must satisfy the upper-division Disciplinary Communication (DC) requirement. Students in physics, applied physics, physics (astrophysics), and physics education satisfy the DC requirement by completing Physics 182, and the senior thesis.

Declaration of the Major

In order to be admitted to the physics, astrophysics, applied physics, or physics education majors students must pass Physics 5A, 5B and 5C with letter grades, and with an average grade point average (GPA) in these three courses of 2.70 or higher. At least two of these three courses must be passed in the first attempt. (Physics 5A has corequisites of Mathematics 19A or 20A and Physics 5L; Physics 5B has prerequisites of Physics 5A and 5L and Mathematics 19A or 20A, and corequisites of Mathematics 19B or 20B and Physics 5M; Physics 5C has prerequisites of Physics 5A and 5L and Mathematics 19B or 20B, and corequisites of Mathematics 23A or 22 and Physics 5N.) Students who are informed that they are not eligible to declare the major may appeal this decision by submitting a letter to the Physics Department office within 15 days from the date the notification was mailed, and meeting with a faculty adviser. Within 15 days of receipt of the appeal, after consulting with the faculty adviser, the department chair will either finalize the denial of admission or specify further conditions for admission, and notify the student, the college, and the Office of the Registrar of the decision.

Letter Grade Policy

For all students entering UCSC in fall 2009 and later, all courses used to satisfy any of the physics major requirements must be taken for a letter grade.

Requirements of the Majors

Physics

The requirements for the major include Physics 5A/L, 5B/M, 5C/N, and 5D; Mathematics 19A or 20A, 19B or 20B, 23A, and either 23B or Physics 14; plus the following upper-division courses: 102, 105, 110A-B, 112, 116A-B-C, 133, 134, 139A, and 182 and the senior thesis.

In addition, students must pass at least two upper-division electives chosen from physics or the following astronomy and astrophysics courses: 111 through 118. In some cases, one of the elective requirements may be satisfied by an approved upper-division science or engineering course.

Students have to satisfy a computer programming requirement by taking one of the following courses, Computer Science 5C, 5J, or 5P, Earth Sciences 119, or Physics 115. Computer Science 5C teaches programming in C/C++, 5J in Java, and 5P in Python for students with no prior experience. Astronomy 119 teaches programming in IDL (commonly used by astronomers) and simple applications. Physics 115 does not teach programming; it assumes basic programming ability in C, C++ or Fortran and discusses numerical techniques relevant to physics. Students may also satisfy the computer programming requirement by demonstrating their knowledge of programming to a faculty member designated by the Physics Department.

Physics (Astrophysics)

The requirements for the major include Physics 5A/L, 5B/M, 5C/N, and 5D; Mathematics 19A or 20A, 19B or 20B, 23A, and either 23B or Physics 14; plus the following upper-division courses: 102, 105, 110A-B, 112, 116A-B-C, 133, 135 or 136 139A and 182 and the senior thesis.

In addition, students must pass at least three upper-division electives selected from the following upper-division courses: Astronomy and Astrophysics 111 through 118, or 171 (cross-listed with Physics 171), or Astronomy and Astrophysics 257, Physics 129.

Students have to satisfy a computer programming requirement by taking one of the following courses Computer Science 5C, 5J, or 5P, Earth Sciences 119, or Physics 115. Computer Science 5C teaches programming in C/C++, 5J in Java, 5P in Python for students with no prior experience. Astronomy 119 teaches programming in IDL (commonly used by astronomers) and simple applications. Physics 115 does not teach programming; it assumes basic programming ability in C, C++ or Fortran and discusses numerical techniques relevant to physics. Students may also satisfy the computer programming requirement by demonstrating their knowledge of programming to a faculty member designated by the Physics Department.

Applied Physics

The requirements for the major include Physics 5A/L, 5B/M, 5C/N, and 5D; Mathematics 19A or 20A, 19B or 20B, 23A, and either 23B or Physics 14; Chemistry 1A or 1B; plus the following upper-division physics courses: 102, 105, 110A-B, 112, 116A-B-C, 133, 134, and 182 and the senior thesis.

In addition, students must pass at least three upper-division applied physics electives selected from the following approved list of courses: Physics 107, 115, 120, 129, 139A, 139B, 152, 155, 156, and 160, 171, 180, Electrical Engineering  101, 103, 115, 130, 145, 154, 171, 172, 178; other courses with approval from a faculty adviser.

Students have to satisfy a computer programming requirement by taking one of the following courses Computer Science 5C, 5J, or 5P, Astronomy 119, or Physics 115. Computer Science 5C teaches programming in C/C++, 5J in Java, 5P in Python for students with no prior experience. Astornomy 119 teaches programming in IDL (commonly used by astronomers) and simple applications. Physics 115 does not teach programming; it assumes basic programming ability in C, C++ or Fortran and discusses numerical techniques relevant to physics. Students may also satisfy the computer programming requirement by demonstrating their knowledge of programming to a faculty member designated by the Physics Department.

Physics Education

The requirements for the major include Physics 5A/L, 5B/M, 5C/N, 5D, 102, 133, 134 or 135 and 182 and the senior thesis; Mathematics 19A or 20A, 19B or 20B, 23A, 23B or Physics 14; Mathematics 100, 128A, 181; Education 50B or 50C, 100B or 100C, 185L, 185B or 185C and one upper-division course dealing with issues of diversity in education; Applied Mathematics and Statistics 5 or 7; and Astronomy 12 or 13. One elective course must be taken from physics, astronomy, mathematics or education courses, or other courses with approval of the department.

Sample Physics Major Planner

The following is a recommended academic plan for students to complete during their four years to fulfill requirements for the physics major.

Year

Fall

Winter

Spring

1st
(frsh)

MATH 19A or 20A

MATH 19B or 20B

MATH 23A

PHYS 5A/L

PHYS 5B/M

PHYS 5C/N

2nd
(soph)

PHYS 5D

PHYS 102

PHYS 116B

MATH 23B

PHYS 116A

CMPS 5C, 5J,  or 5P
PHYS 133*

3rd
(jr)

PHYS 105

PHYS 110A

PHYS 110B

PHYS 116C

PHYS 112

PHYS 139A

PHYS 134*

4th
(sr)

PHYS 182***

PHYS elective**

Senior Thesis

PHYS elective**

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis


* Physics 133 is offered fall and winter quarters. Physics 134 is offered winter and spring quarters and may be taken in the junior or senior year after completing Physics  133.
**Students should look into taking electives earlier where possible, as some courses are only offered every alternate year.
***Physics 182 will be offered twice yearly, fall and winter quarters.

Sample Physics (Astrophysics) Major Planner

The following is a recommended academic plan for students to complete during their four years to fulfill requirements for the physics (astrophysics) major.

Year

Fall

Winter

Spring

1st
(frsh)

MATH 19A or 20A

MATH 19B or 20B

MATH 23A

PHYS 5A/L

PHYS 5B/M

PHYS 5C/N

2nd
(soph)

PHYS 5D

PHYS 102

PHYS 116B

MATH 23B

PHYS 133*

PHYS 116A

3rd
(jr)

PHYS 105

PHYS 110A

PHYS 110B

PHYS 116C

PHYS 112

PHYS 139A

ASTR 119^ PHYS 136^^
 

4th
(sr)

PHYS 182***

ASTR elective** ASTR elective

PHYS 135*

Senior Thesis Senior Thesis

ASTR elective**

Senior Thesis

* Physics 133 is offered fall and winter quarters. Physics 135 is offered fall quarter and may be taken in the junior or senior year after completing Physics 133.
**Students should look into taking electives earlier where possible, as some courses are only offered every alternate year.
***Physics 182 will be offered twice yearly, fall and winter quarters.
^Astronomy 1119 is one of several ways to satisfy the programming requirement.
^^Physics 136 may be taken instead of Physics 135 by students interested in a research career in astrophysics.

Sample Applied Physics Major Planner

The following is a recommended academic plan for students to complete during their four years to fulfill requirements for the applied physics major.

Year

Fall

Winter

Spring

1st
(frsh)

MATH 19A or 20A

MATH 19B or 20B

MATH 23A

PHYS 5A/L

PHYS 5B/M

PHYS 5C/N

2nd
(soph)

PHYS 5D

PHYS 102

PHYS 116B

MATH 23B

PHYS 116A

CMPS 5C, 5J, or 5P

CHEM 1A

3rd
(jr)

PHYS 105

PHYS 110A

PHYS 110B

PHYS 116C

PHYS 112

Apph elective**

PHYS 133*

PHYS 134*

PHYS 11
(recommended)

4th
(sr)

PHYS 182***

Senior Thesis

Apph elective**

Apph elective**

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis

* Physics 133 is offered fall and winter quarters. Physics 134 is offered winter and spring quarters and may be in the taken junior or senior year after completing Physics 133.
** Students should look into taking electives earlier where possible, as some courses are only offered every alternate year.
***Physics 182 will be offered twice yearly, fall and winter quarters.

Sample Physics Education Major Planner

The following is a recommended academic plan for students to complete during their four years to fulfill requirements for the physics (astrophysics) major.

Year

Fall

Winter

Spring

1st
(frsh)

MATH 19A or 20A

MATH 19B or 20B

MATH 23A

PHYS 5A/L

PHYS 5B/M

PHYS 5C/N

2nd
(soph)

PHYS 5D

MATH 100

EDUC 100B or 100C
(2 credits)

EDUC 50B or 50C
(2 credits)

PHYS 133*

PHYS 102

3rd
(jr)

MATH 23B

PHYS 134*^

MATH 181

 AMS 5 or 7 MATH 128A

PHYS 135*^

EDUC 185B/C

ASTR 12/13

4th
(sr)

EDUC diversity
course

Elective

Senior Thesis
PHYS 182** EDUC 185/L (2 credits)

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis

*Physics 133 is offered fall and winter quarters. Physics 134 is offered in winter and spring quarters and may be taken in the junior or senior year after completing Physics 133. Physics 135 is offered some academic years as a multiple-term course: 135A in fall and 135B in winter or spring, depending on astronomical conditions.
**Physics 182 will be offered twice yearly, fall and winter quarters.
^Either Physics 134 or 135 must be taken

Depending on the student’s interests, further preparation for graduate school in physics, astrophysics, applied physics, or for other careers is obtained by electing more specialized or applied courses (see the descriptions of courses below). In addition, again depending on the student’s academic focus, elective courses may be selected in mathematics, astronomy and astrophysics, and/or other areas of physical science.

Comprehensive Requirement

The comprehensive exit requirement is normally satisfied by the submission and approval of a thesis. To satisfy the comprehensive requirement via a thesis Physics 182  is required. Note that successful completion of Physics 182 and the senior thesis satisfies the Disciplinary Communication requirement.

In special cases, minor modifications of these requirements may be granted to suit the specific program of a particular student. Before embarking on a program needing such waivers, students should discuss their plans with a physics adviser and seek approval by petition from the Physics Department office.

Honors

The department awards "honors" (3.5 grade point average or better) and "highest honors"(3.8 GPA or better) to top graduating students each year. Recommendations for these awards are made by the department chair and are based upon excellence of academic performance, particularly in upper-division physics courses, as reflected in grades and the narrative evaluations. The department also awards "honors" for outstanding work on the senior thesis, made upon the recommendation of the senior thesis supervisor and the thesis technical adviser.

Minor Requirements

Requirements for the minor in physics include Physics 5A/L, 5B/M, 5C/N, 5D (or Physics 6A/L, 6B/M, 6C/N with minimum GPA of 3.5); Mathematics 19A or 20A, 19B or 20B, 23A, 23B or Physics 14; Physics 102, 133, and 134 and three courses chosen from physics upper-division elective (some of which have prerequisites), or from a list of courses from other departments approved by the Physics Undergraduate Committee. See the Physics Department for the listing.

Advising and Preparation for the Major

Because the courses for the physics major are sequential, it is strongly advised that students declare their major in physics, astrophysics, or applied physics as early as possible (either at initial registration or by the end of the first year, if possible). Students who do not begin the lower-division requirements during their first year will have difficulty completing the program within four years. Transfer students may also have problems completing the program within the usual time, depending upon whether they took equivalent courses at their previous institutions. The department adviser works closely with students interested in pursuing the major to ensure that they begin the program immediately and follow the appropriate steps toward its completion.

High school students coming directly to UCSC should emphasize their mathematics preparation with the expectation that they will take calculus in their first quarter at UCSC in order to concurrently take the Physics 5 series, calculus-based physics for physics majors.

Students transferring to UCSC as junior physics, astrophysics, or applied physics majors should have completed three quarters of introductory calculus-based physics with laboratory and three quarters of calculus. It is also desirable to have an introductory course in modern physics as well as mathematics courses in linear algebra, vector calculus, and differential equations. The Physics Department advises each junior transfer student individually upon their arrival.

Graduate Programs

The Physics Department offers graduate programs leading to the master of science (M.S.) and/or the doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees. In the first year of study, Ph.D. students are expected to take two core graduate-level courses per quarter, including the courses required for the Ph.D. degree (210, 212, 214, 215, 216, 219) and other courses specific to the student’s field of interest. All first-year students also take 205, Introduction to Research. All graduate students also attend a weekly colloquium, 292. Each student has a faculty adviser who helps to determine which courses are most appropriate, taking into account the student’s background and interests. The student-faculty ratio is low so that M.S. and Ph.D. students can work closely with faculty and pursue programs that fit their individual needs. Research is currently conducted in theoretical and experimental particle physics, theoretical and experimental condensed matter physics (including materials physics and biophysics), and in theoretical and experimental high-energy astrophysics (including cosmology). After passing a written qualifying examination, Ph.D. students pursue independent research leading to an oral examination and completion of a doctoral dissertation.

Students may obtain a master’s degree through course work (eight physics graduate courses) and submission of an approved thesis. The thesis may be waived by passing four sections of the written Ph.D. qualifying examination. Master’s candidates are encouraged to write a research thesis and may do so in any of the research fields in the program, thereby developing laboratory and computational skills in areas such as electronics design, computer simulation and visualization, cryogenics, X-ray scattering, complex novel materials and devices, or materials science. Each M.S. student is assigned a faculty adviser who helps to design a course work plan suited to the interests of the student.

Physics students and faculty use a number of UCSC research facilities (described at the beginning of this section and elsewhere in this catalog): the Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics (SCIPP) and Lick Observatory (headquartered at UCSC). There is strong interaction with other disciplines, especially astronomy and astrophysics, biology, chemistry, Earth sciences, electrical engineering, and mathematics. Proximity to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory provides additional local research opportunities. UCSC faculty and graduate students also participate in research programs at CERN in Geneva, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, NASA Ames, NREL, Lucent, Xerox, IBM, Bell Labs, and other national and international laboratories.

Application materials and brochures describing the physics M.S. and Ph.D. graduate programs in more detail may be obtained by visiting our web site at http://physics.ucsc.edu/ or by contacting the Division of Graduate Studies at http://graddiv.ucsc.edu.

Five-year B.S./M.S. program

The new five year combined B.S./M.S. in physics program provides highly motivated undergraduate majors the opportunity to earn a M.S. degree in five years. The program provides the additional level of preparation and experience that students need to pursue careers in industry and government. Students in the B.S./M.S. physics program can pursue concentrations in materials and device physics, energy and the environment, computational physics, finance and economics, and medical biophysics. Students apply to be admitted to the B.S./M.S. program, in consultation with their faculty or undergraduate advisor, no later than the end of the second quarter of the junior year. To be accepted to the program, students will need to have demonstrated solid performance in general and in the major, as demonstrated by: 1) a G.P.A. in physics courses of at least 3.0; 2) an overall G.P.A .of at least 3.0; and 3) a recommendation from a faculty member attesting to the student’s promise for the M.S. degree in physics.

Applied Physics majors are strongly advised to take Physics 139A as one of their electives. The Five-year B.S./M.S. program is not suitable for Physics Education Majors.

Course Requirements

All students in the 5‐year BS/MS program will be expected to take a core set of four physics courses, including:

PHYS 212. Electromagnetism I;

PHYS 215. Introduction to Non‐Relativistic Quantum Mechanics;

PHYS 216. Advanced Topics in Non‐Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

PHYS 219. Statistical Physics;

plus four electives in the concentration areas described below. Typically, at least one of these electives will be another physics graduate course. One of the elective courses can be an upper-division undergraduate course upon approval of the faculty coordinator and Graduate Committee.

Two of these elective courses can also serve to fulfill the elective requirement for the B.S. degree.

Materials and Device Physics

This concentration prepares students who are interested in pursuing industrial jobs in the areas of materials science, semiconductors, and optoelectronic devices.

Elective courses include AMS 205A, CHEM 261, CHEM 269, CE 218, CE 218L, EE 211, EE 223, EE 224 EE 225, EE 231, PHYS 231, PHYS 232, PHYS 233, PHYS 242.

Energy and the Environment

This concentration prepares students who are interested in pursuing industrial or government jobs in the areas of sustainable-energy technologies, environmental and climate change and scientific policy related to these areas.

Elective courses include CHEM 268, CHEM 269, EPS 220, EPS 254, EPS 272, EPS 280D, ECON 250, ECON 259B, ENVS 271, PHYS 233, PHYS 242.

Finance and Economics

This concentration prepares students who are interested in pursuing industrial or government jobs in the areas of finance, monetary policy, and economics.

Elective courses include AMS 205A, ECON 200 ECON 202, ECON 209A, ECON 209B, ECON 210A, ECON 210B, ECON 216, ECON 217, ECON 212, ECON 221A, ECON 221B, ECON 223, ECON 234, ECON 235, ECON 236, ISM 205, ISM 230, ISM 245, PHYS 242.

Computational Physics

This concentration prepares students who are interested in pursuing industrial or government jobs in the areas related to using computational methods to solve applied problems as well as computer‐based visualization methods for data presentation. Students interested in computational methods in biology could also consider the concentration in medical biophysics.

Elective courses include AMS 215, BMSE 205, BMSE 211, BMSE 230, BMSE 203L, CHEM 265, CE 215, CS 203, CS 210, CS 211, CS 240, CS 261, PHYS 242.

Medical BioPhysics

This concentration prepares students who are interested in pursuing industrial and hospital jobs in the areas of medical technology, biomolecular engineering, and biophysics.

Elective courses include AMS 215, BMSE/CHEM 255, BMSE 205, BMSE 215, BMSE 220, BMSE 220L, BMSE 222, BMSE 230, BMSE 203L, BMSE 250, BMSE 250L, CHEM 200A, EE 212, MCDB 200B, PHYS 180.

Course Schedule

Year

Fall

Winter

Spring

4th
(sr)

Elective*

Elective*

PHYS 219

Elective*

5th

PHYS 212

PHYS 215

PHYS 216

Elective* Elective* Elective*

Thesis

Thesis

Thesis

Students may find it helpful to start their master’s thesis during the summer at the end of their fourth year.

*Alternate quarters for completing the four electives

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Revised: 09/01/14