The Colleges

2016-17 General Catalog

Cowell College | Stevenson College | Crown College | Merrill College | Porter College | Kresge College | Oakes College | Rachel Carson College | College Nine | College Ten


The Colleges

UC Santa Cruz combines the resources of a world-class public research university with a distinctive undergraduate experience characterized by our college system. Each college is a vibrant living/learning community supported by faculty and staff who provide academic support, organize student activities, and sponsor events that enhance the intellectual and social life of the campus. The colleges are committed to fostering a nurturing and academically thriving environment for students of all backgrounds. Each college strives to promote the attributes of a diverse and multicultural community in its own unique way.

In order of founding, the colleges are Cowell, Stevenson, Crown, Merrill, Porter, Kresge, Oakes, Rachel Carson College, College Nine, and College Ten. Self-contained and architecturally distinct, each college is a relatively small community of 30 to 110 faculty members and between 1,400 and 1,700 students, about half of whom live on campus. Each college has its own housing, as well as academic and recreational programming, and each is an integral part of the larger campus. The colleges have their own academic emphases and cultural traditions, although each seeks faculty and students from a variety of disciplines to foster broad intellectual interests. The colleges play a primary role in academic advising and are the center of student life. Students graduate from their college. At the same time, all university academic programs, resources, and student services are open to students of every college.

All undergraduate students are affiliated with one of our 10 colleges, their home within the larger university. During the process of accepting the offer of admission, entering students are asked to list several colleges in order of preference; whenever possible, students are assigned to one of their preferred colleges. The information students need to rank their college preferences can come from a variety of sources—personal acquaintance, a campus visit, literature available from the colleges, campus websites, and the descriptions in this section of the catalog. Students also have the option to indicate “no preference,” meaning they will be fine with any of our 10 colleges, and the Admissions Office will assign those students to one of the colleges.

Similarities and Differences

The colleges are small-scale residential communities, each providing an academically and socially supportive environment and offering special programs designed to help students transition to campus life, build a strong connection with the campus, and get the most out of their UCSC experience.

Each college provides academic advising as well as academic and general campus orientations to help you plan your academic program. College academic preceptors and advisers provide advice on general academic matters outside a student’s major, including general education, choosing a major, and strategies for academic success. Psychological and personal counseling is also available in each college. The faculty, or fellows, of each college come from a variety of academic disciplines; many faculty have their offices in the colleges.

Each college offers a distinctive academic core course for entering frosh. The required course provides a significant bridge between academic and residential life, since all frosh, regardless of major, will be in the course, and most will be in residence as well. The colleges also offer selected courses in their area of interdisciplinary emphasis and host events and speakers that enhance this focus.

Architecturally distinct, each college was planned by a different architect who was encouraged to convey the distinct personality of that college through the design of its buildings and their placement in the natural environment. The particular style of housing varies among the colleges, ranging from residence halls, with a mix of shared and private rooms, to apartment-style housing, where students live together in small groups and may do some of their own cooking. Each college’s residential program is a team effort. Professional staff (coordinators of residential education) work with students trained as resident assistants and help organize activities and events, provide referral information about academic or personal concerns, and assist with roommate problems.

Changing Colleges

Most students develop friendships and intellectual attachments within their affiliated college, and remain members of that college throughout their undergraduate years. Some students find that changing academic interests draw them to a different college. During specified filing periods, students may request a change of college with the approval of both college administrations.

Cowell College

Cowell College inaugurated the Santa Cruz campus when it opened with a pioneer class of 600 students in 1965. The founding faculty shaped an educational program that challenged and enriched students through wide-ranging inquiry and disciplined study. Today, Cowell has more than 1,500 affiliated students and over 90 faculty fellows. Its motto—The Pursuit of Truth in the Company of Friends—expresses a continuing commitment to create a serious academic environment within a humane and broadly inclusive community. The college is named for the S. H. Cowell Foundation, which endowed the college at its founding.

Academic Emphases

The academic theme of the college encourages students to pursue their general and disciplinary study with attention to the values of liberal arts education: understanding one’s individual perspectives by exploration of one's historical background and world context. Students affiliated with the college pursue majors from all departments on campus.

In satisfying their general education requirements, first-year Cowell students are required to take the Cowell core course in the fall term. The core course, Cowell 80, is taught in small seminar sections and seeks to develop critical reading, analytical writing, and seminar discussion skills by reading a selection of classic and contemporary texts focused on the theme of justice.

Enrichment courses are offered every term at the college, and priority is given to Cowell students. Some courses emphasize the development of skills such as public speaking or researching in library collections. Some courses take a broader perspective, examining the role of education in democracy or the epistemological bases of our judicial system.

The college also enriches the intellectual and cultural life of the campus by sponsoring events of various kinds: lectures and presentations by local faculty and visiting scholars, theatrical and musical performances, and forums and debates on topics of current interest.

Students who develop ideas for research, creative projects, community service, or internship experiences may apply to the college provost for financial support. The college also awards several annual scholarships and sponsors prizes for outstanding academic work.

The faculty fellows affiliated with the college represent all academic divisions (arts, engineering, humanities, physical and biological sciences, and social sciences). The faculty fellows guide the college academic programs and often contribute to the college-based advising system.

The college academic buildings house humanities faculty, with notable concentrations in philosophy, classics (study of ancient Greek and Latin language and civilization), and modern foreign languages, especially Chinese, French, Italian, Russian, German, and Japanese. Interdisciplinary faculty groups in visual and performance studies and in pre-and early-modern studies are centered at Cowell College.

College Scholars Program

Along with several other residential colleges, Cowell participates in the College Scholars Program. Students who join the program in the fall term are housed together and take their core course together. In the winter, they join with fall-start College Scholars from three other colleges to take a special service-learning course. In the spring of their first year, the spring-start scholars join the fall-start scholars in a special two-credit class together, which includes special lectures and dinners. The program continues with selected seminars in the second year.

College Community and Facilities

Cowell’s seven residence halls and three apartment buildings are arranged in three quadrangles on a hillside overlooking the city of Santa Cruz and Monterey Bay. About 700 students are housed in the college. Most floors are mixed gender with all students sharing common lounges and other facilities, but single-gender floors are provided for those who prefer this arrangement. Apartments house continuing students, mostly juniors and seniors. The residential staff members facilitate diverse educational, social, and recreational programming to enhance the living and learning environment.

Arranged around the college’s central courtyard are the dining hall, the Page Smith Study Library, the Mary Holmes Fireside lounge, the coffee shop, and conference rooms and classrooms. The Cowell Press, where students can learn the fine technique of hand-operated letterpress printing, is a stone’s throw away from the plaza. Also nearby is the Eloise Pickard Smith Gallery, including the Ann Dzikes Annex.

Since the college’s founding, regularly scheduled College Nights in the dining hall have offered students, staff, and faculty a special meal and a rich mix of programs. Community life is enlivened by many other scheduled and impromptu intellectual, cultural, and social events.

The Student Senate meets weekly to discuss campus issues and student government. The Senate advises the college on the allocation of funds for student activities and programs. Members of the Senate are selected each year by lot, but any student may become a voting member by steady attendance at meetings. The college’s student groups, staff, and faculty work together to create a supportive community for students from all ethnic groups, all religious traditions, and all sexual orientations and to increase awareness of the many dimensions of diversity in the community.

For more information on the college, see the Cowell College website or call (831) 459-2253.

Cowell Fellows and Staff

Cowell College faculty fellows are listed here.
College staff are listed here.

Stevenson College

“We are Stevensonians; we are free agents of history and masters of our own destinies. Every one of us is important, and we cherish our differences as much as we cherish our shared values of love, chivalry, honesty, hard work, and responsibility.”

—Seung Kyun Joseph Mok, Stevenson Alumnus/Regents Scholar

Stevenson College is named after former statesman and U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Adlai E. Stevenson. Our faculty, students, and staff take pride in intellectual critical inquiry, academic and civic leadership, and respect for students’ concerns about shared student governance, human rights, and social justice.

Stevenson College has a long-standing reputation for excellence in liberal education. The college strives to provide an academically, culturally, and socially supportive environment for all its members, fostering social responsibility and academic achievement. Stevenson has brought to the campus distinguished individuals such as Senator George McGovern, Congresswoman Bella Abzug, Nobel Laureate Elie Wiesel, Chief of the Miwok Tribe Greg Sarris, Producer Lourdes Portillo, and Associate Director-Counsel Theodore M. Shaw of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

The college’s faculty and staff offer professional and personal service for the diverse needs of students. Faculty and staff assist students in all areas of their academic and social experience at Stevenson College, and are committed to instilling respect for the diverse backgrounds of Stevenson students.

Academic Emphases

  • Faculty drawn from social sciences, humanities, and natural sciences

  • Two-quarter frosh core course

  • Writing assistants

  • Junior Fellows Program

The faculty at Stevenson, drawn from a variety of disciplines in the social sciences, humanities, and physical and biological sciences, share a common concern for the study of social processes that shape modern society and determine the quality of our individual lives throughout various global regions and periods of world history. Linguistics, history, sociology, politics, psychology, biology, chemistry, and computer science are strongly represented in the college.

Stevenson distinguishes itself as the only college with a two-quarter core course intended to provide all first-year students with a common academic experience. The core course allows for more rigorous development of students’ critical, writing, and analytical skills. It provides a unique learning environment and a supportive intellectual community for all Stevenson first-year students. Those admitted as transfer students are exempt from the core course requirement but may take the core course at their option pending available space. Lower-division transfer students who, prior to enrolling, have not completed at least one UC-transferable college English composition course with a minimum grade of C (2.0) are able to take the core course to satisfy the C1 requirement. Stevenson alumni can be found in legal, political, educational, engineering, medical, computer and information sciences, business, and public administration careers, among others.

The Stevenson core course, Self and Society, enables students to examine the nature of the self and the relationship of the individual to society. In addition, the course fosters an intellectual commitment to the general philosophy that has helped to define Stevenson College since its inception: preservation of human dignity, the social cultivation of individual creativity and citizenship, and a belief in ethical responsibility. The core course reflects the college’s long-standing commitment to interdisciplinary and culturally diverse readings, while at the same time affording students an opportunity to develop research interests, to acquire greater understanding of the role of research universities in contemporary societies, and to acquire the requisite skills to engage in increasingly more sophisticated intellectual work while at UCSC.

Students have the opportunity to apply for funding for special research projects each quarter. Stevenson also provides several annual scholarships and service awards, including the Josh Alper Marines Memorial Award, the Michele Guard Memorial Scholarship, the Matthew Graviano Memorial Scholarship, the John Halverson Scholarship, the Sandor Callahan Scholarship Award, and the Robert Dodge Service Award.

The Stevenson College Junior Fellows Program offers juniors and seniors an opportunity to serve as instructors in Self and Society. Junior fellows, who must have completed outstanding work in Self and Society during their first year, undergo a rigorous application and selection process. Junior fellows (enrolled in Stevenson 120, Teaching Practicum) earn five course credits.

Stevenson provides writing assistance for all of its students. Stevenson Writing Assistantships are paid student positions open to juniors and seniors with excellent academic records.

College Community Programs

  • College Nights

  • Stevenson Student Council

  • Social and Multicultural Programs/Activities

  • Cultural Arts and Diversity Rainbow Theater

Stevenson holds regular College Nights, a long-held tradition where Stevenson faculty, staff, and students to get together for a special, themed dinner followed by entertainment.

The Stevenson Student Council meets on Thursday evenings. This group is responsible for allocating college membership fees to student activities. The council also serves as a forum for the discussion of college and campuswide issues and appoints student representatives to college and campuswide committees.

Facilities

  • Eight small residence halls, four of which are themed houses:
    • Outdoor Adventure House
    • Sustainability House
    • Diversity and Social Justice House
    • The Rosa Parks African American Theme House
  • Three apartment buildings

  • Coffee house

  • Wagstaff Fireside Lounge

  • Writers’ Center

  • Stevenson Library

  • Stevenson Event Center

  • Silverman Conference Room

  • Recreation room

Stevenson has a wide variety of facilities and activities to appeal to many tastes. The college, designed by San Francisco architect Joseph Esherick, has won many architectural awards. The buildings are situated amid redwood trees and sprawling lawns, and the main quad overlooks Monterey Bay. Stevenson is situated close to the campus bookstore, restaurants, McHenry Library, gym, and pool. There are eight small residence houses at the college providing a choice of single-gender or mixed-gender floors; each house accommodates about 90 undergraduates. The apartments provide space for 156 continuing students. Nearby are a picnic area, playing fields, and a garden.

The Stevenson Coffee House, which has become the gathering place in the college, is a friendly and inviting spot to enjoy lunch or an espresso and pastry—indoors or out on the patio. It is the scene of lively conversation, occasional musical entertainment, and chess matches. Adjoining the coffee house is the recreation room, with Ping-Pong, foosball, pool tables, and television. This area is also the site of much socializing and spontaneous group activity.

In contrast, the Stevenson Library is a striking building designed for quiet reading and study. The Wagstaff Fireside Lounge, a retreat for relaxed discussion, is also used for recitals, special lectures, meetings, and residence house activities. Art exhibits (both student and professional) are on display throughout the year in the lounge, library, and coffee house.

For more information on the college, see the Stevenson College website or call (831) 459-4930.

Stevenson College Fellows and Staff

Stevenson College faculty fellows are listed here.
Stevenson College staff are listed here.

Crown College

Crown College faculty and students represent a wide variety of academic disciplines. The majority of the faculty teaches in the physical, biological and social sciences. Crown has a higher percentage of science and engineering students than any of the other colleges, but it also has majors in the social sciences, humanities, and arts. This diversity of interests and academic training enriches our intellectual environment. An important goal of the college is to foster an appreciation for the contributions of diverse cultural groups and to provide an atmosphere in which issues of both diversity and common social purpose are integrated into a wide range of programs and discussions.

Crown is located on a hilltop surrounded by a redwood forest. The core buildings consist of an administration office, dining commons, lounge spaces, study spaces, faculty offices, and classrooms built around a large patio and central fountain. The award-winning architecture with its white walls and high-pitched tiled roofs suggests a hillside Mediterranean village. The college’s residential facilities house approximately 800 students. The facilities at Crown College were built through a partnership of public funds and a gift from the Crown Zellerbach Foundation.

Academic Emphases

From the time of its founding in 1967, issues pertaining to the role of science and technology in society have been a focus of special interest at Crown College. We approach these issues from an interdisciplinary perspective that recognizes the influence of social and cultural factors on the scientific enterprise, as well as the ways in which science and technology influence our society.

More recently, Crown is adding an entrepreneurship and innovation component through its partnership with the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurial Development (CIED). This partnership includes co-sponsoring talks and slams as well as a summer class in entrepreneurship.

In the 2014–15 academic year, the Crown College core course, which examines how technologies impact society through a critical lens, became a two-quarter sequence with Crown 79 in fall followed by Crown 80A/B in winter. Crown 79 is a 2-credit class that introduces students to Crown 80A/B, while teaching strategies for effective group work, which is an essential skill in today’s increasingly complex and connected world. The class is articulated around a group project and is offered in a small seminar format (sections of approximately 20 students). Crown 80A/B builds on the readings and discussions of Crown 79 to focus on college-level writing skills. This class is enhanced through presentations or attendance at a capstone conference, the Social Fiction Conference. With a focus on the intersection of social justice topics in science fiction, fantasy, and gaming, this conference features keynote speakers, movies, debates, and presentations in a variety of formats. The winter core courses (Crown 80A/B) are required of all non-transfer students during their first quarters at UCSC; Crown 79 is only required for non-honors ELWR-satisfied students. As with the core courses from our sister colleges, the development of critical reading and writing skills is a major thrust of Crown 79, 80A, and 80B.

Crown College emphasizes experiential learning facilitates the establishment of internships with faculty fellows through advertising of individual projects and by providing funding to support them.

Crown, in collaboration with Merrill College, offers a Leadership Development Program, which combines leadership theory with a variety of internship opportunities.

In addition, Crown College offers the College Scholars and the Science Learning Community programs. The College Scholars Program provides a congenial and challenging academic home for a select group of well-prepared students at UC Santa Cruz. This enriched program of study includes special courses, seminars, colloquia, and other events into the fall of the sophomore year. Admission to the College Scholars Program can be by invitation during the admissions process based on high school academic performance (early entry) or in winter of the freshman year based on academic potential revealed during the first quarter at UCSC (late entry).

The Crown Science Learning Community (SLC) is an innovative program that provides extra support to first-year students who are interested in pursuing a major in the sciences or engineering. Students enrolled in this program live together, forming a supportive community that promotes collaborative learning and group problem solving. To facilitate this process, SLC students are placed in a special section of Chemistry 1A or Math 3 and participate in a residentially based study group. The program often acts as a bridge to the ACE Program in the physical and biological sciences and engineering.

Similar to the Science Learning Community, Crown’s Baskin Scholars Community focuses on underrepresented student success in engineering. Participants are housed together and receive tutoring, mentoring, and other assistance.

College Community and Facilities

Crown sponsors a wide variety of co-curricular events spanning cultural, educational, and social areas of interest. One popular series is the Science/Public Affairs Tables, informal dinners at the Provost House offering students an opportunity to socialize with a faculty member outside the classroom and learn about his or her research.

Students become involved in Crown life by both initiating and participating in a wide range of activities. Social activities vary each year according to the interests of students. At the monthly College Night in the dining commons, a special dinner is followed by entertainment, both often sharing a common cultural theme. Some major events have become a tradition: for example, Epic Game Tournaments, the Crown Semi-Formal, and quarterly Regression Nights. Crown activities and dances draw students from all over campus. Outdoor activities organized by the student government, the College Programs Office, or residential staff range from whale watching on the Monterey Bay to ultimate Frisbee, and from backpacking to stargazing.

The Crown Student Senate (CSS), the elected student government at Crown, holds open weekly meetings to recommend fund allocations for student activities and to discuss issues of concern to students and the college. CSS also sponsors events to enhance the college experience, including the very popular Casino Night.

At Crown College, we believe that the experience of living in our on-campus residence halls and apartments offers students not only support for their academic experiences, but also unique opportunities for learning about the concept of community. When college students feel connected to a community during their studies, they experience a smoother transition to university life, greater academic success, and higher satisfaction with their college experience. The Crown Residential Education team understands community not as a product we can deliver to our students, but as an experience that they are responsible for creating for and with each other. Even so, we do not ask our students to undertake this weighty task on their own. The Residential Education team partners with students, striving to be “good companions” on their journey by facilitating experiences that help them to cultivate and apply the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to create, participate in, and lead caring and socially just communities.
Crown offers two types of residential facilities: residence halls and apartments. Eight traditional residence halls each house approximately 60 students in single, double, and triple rooms in a coed environment (single-gender bedrooms with unisex bathrooms) or on a few all-female floors. For students interested in living and learning in a special-interest environment, Crown provides the Gaming House, Outdoor Pursuits and Academic Success Houses, Arts & Humanities House, the Science and Engineering Learning Communities, and continuing student houses.

The college also has apartments for approximately 230 third- and fourth-year students. Like the residence halls, the apartments are built on a small scale. Each three-story building has two or three apartments per floor that house four to six students in a combination of single, double, and triple rooms and include a kitchen, living room, dining room, bathroom, and outside deck.

Other facilities in the college include the Crown Library study space; a modern computer laboratory housing Mac workstations, which provides students with access to several kinds of systems and an array of applications and instructional software selected to support academic coursework; the Fireside Lounge with a piano and a flatscreen television; and the Music Practice Room. The Crown-Merrill Community Room, with a television, pool table, foosball, and ping-pong table, provides an informal place to study, hold meetings, or just visit with friends. Dining facilities boast continuous dining and Banana Joe’s take-out and quick mart.

For general information, call the College Office at (831) 459-2665 or visit the Crown College website. For residential information, call the Housing and Residential Education Office at (831) 459-5689.

Crown Fellows and Staff

Crown College faculty fellows are listed here.
Crown College staff are listed here.

Merrill College

Merrill College seeks to expand its students’ awareness of their own heritage and of the diversity of cultures around the world, past and present. Merrill faculty specialize in a number of different areas of study, concentrating especially on social theory, international affairs, and social change, and from a variety of disciplinary perspectives including history, the social sciences, literature, and foreign language study. The college makes a special effort to be a home for students from different cultural backgrounds and for international students; it presents unique opportunities to those who value multicultural perspectives.

Merrill houses the departments of politics, legal studies, and Latin American and Latino studies. Merrill hosts the visits of a Peace Corps satellite officer who helps UCSC students interested in working overseas to apply to the Peace Corps after graduation, and houses KZSC, the campus radio station. It also hosts the Chicano Latino Research Center; UCSC’s Cantú Queer Center; the student-run Pottery Co-op (the only one of its kind at UCSC); and the Ming Ong Computer Center, a modern computer facility with more than 40 state-of-the-art personal computers.

College Theme and Core Course

Cultural Identities and Global Consciousness is the ethos of Merrill College and is reflected in the theme of the college core course. Readings focus on historical or political flashpoints, particularly those illuminating social, cultural, and economic change in relationships between the developed and the developing world. Students read the daily New York Times, which provides an unfolding narrative about events around the world and offers a valuable opportunity for students to analyze how these events are represented for a U.S. audience. Several book-length texts, and accompanying secondary literature, simultaneously offer case studies and further opportunities for analysis. Recent readings have included texts examining Chicano/Latino, Asian, African, Indian, Pakistani, and Egyptian Islamic experiences. Linked lectures, events, and films illuminate the case studies. The works studied expand international awareness by showing individuals and groups dealing with critical issues of nationalism, globalization, war, economic underdevelopment, and social and gender differentials. They frequently identify forms of social activism that respond to and seek to overcome violence and other problems. Students develop strategies for effectively reading different kinds of texts, formulate their own analyses in relation to these readings, and share their ideas in writing and seminar discussions. The course thus emphasizes skills central to intellectual life at the university: critical reading, analytical writing, and oral presentation of ideas. Those admitted as transfer students are exempt from the core course requirement but may take it at their discretion.

Other Courses and Academic Initiatives

Merrill sponsors a variety of two-, three-, and five-credit courses on topics that change from year to year. Recently these have focused on theory-backed experiential learning. Our new leadership course, shared with Crown College, teaches the “social change” theory of leadership; a field study practicum teaches methods of responsible participant observation and helps students arrange internships in local agencies and organizations; and an education-focused service-learning course, Classroom Connection, addresses current issues in educational theory and arranges for students to volunteer in local public schools. In keeping with Merrill’s spirit of community-mindedness, we have recently offered the Careers in Public Service course, featuring Merrill alumni as weekly speakers.

Continuing the college’s long history of involvement with Africa studies, Merrill has also offered a series of alumnus-led courses that focus on Africa. Merrill offers an upper-division class on the research university for recent transfer students and participates in the College Scholars Program (a merging of the Honors and Challenge Programs), which provides a series of stimulating research-based opportunities (a speaker series, seminars, and research funding opportunities) for eligible first-year students.

Recognizing the increasingly rigorous requirements for science majors, Merrill—in collaboration with the Academic Excellence Program—coordinates the Science Learning Community to support students majoring in the sciences. Students participating in the program enroll in small discussion sections that encourage a collaborative learning approach.

Another new spring class, jointly sponsored with Crown College, supports purposeful, effective student leadership via a two-part theory and practice sequence. Leveraging experiential education opportunities already in place at the colleges, this year’s offering, Leadership for Social Change, prepares resident assistants and student government officers for their work at the colleges. Next year, students interested in off-campus opportunities will complete the leadership sequence by enrolling in a new section of the course, followed by Merrill Field Study—a course taught by Merrill affiliate Mike Rotkin that is now in its third year.

The Merrill Undergraduate Research Mentorship Program aims to prepare advanced undergraduate students to pursue graduate studies and provides research experience and personal and professional development for Merrill students. Merrill faculty fellows nominate Merrill students who share their interests to serve as paid research assistants; the fellows gain ground on their work, while the students gain invaluable experience and mentorship, and about $800 (or more, for eligible work-study students) for their work.

The Merrill Society, an alumni-led organization, helps support Merrill’s curriculum and cultural events.

College Community and Facilities

At Merrill College, we believe that the experience of living in our on-campus residence halls and apartments offers students not only support for their academic experiences, but also unique opportunities for learning about the concept of community. When college students feel connected to a community during their studies, they experience a smoother transition to university life, greater academic success, and higher satisfaction with their college experience. The Merrill Residential Education team understands community not as a product we can deliver to our students, but an experience that they are responsible for creating for and with each other. Even so, we do not ask our students to undertake this weighty task on their own. The Residential Education team aims to partner with students, striving to be “good companions” on their journey by facilitating experiences that help them to cultivate and apply the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to create, participate in, and lead caring and socially just communities.

Located on a hilltop between UCSC’s famed Chadwick Garden and Santa Cruz’s Pogonip parkland, Merrill’s newly renovated, award-winning buildings thread upward through the edge of a redwood forest. Four residence halls house approximately 550 students in two high-rise structures and two smaller buildings. Glass curtain walls provide views from the A & B Buildings of the reconstructed college center and new restaurant building. Patios, benches, a central lawn, and an indoor/outdoor café make excellent use of the ample sunshine and common space for students living in the residence halls and other housing options.

The apartments, located a short distance from the central area of the college, house 180 continuing Merrill students. Grouped amid winding pathways and redwood trees, these three-story buildings have two or three apartments per floor. Each apartment houses four to six students in a combination of single, double, and triple rooms, and comes fully equipped with a kitchen and a bathroom, a large living area, and an outside deck. Residents of the apartment complex share a large community room, two laundry rooms, and plenty of outdoor space.

Facilities at Merrill include the Cultural Center, where large events (including “Merrill, the Musical” and the Glitterball) take place; the Baobab Lounge, which provides study space, a piano, and a television; and Casa Latina and Merrill Academic Success (MAS), which provide Merrill students with quiet places to study. MAS also provides close evening access to computers and a printer. Finally, Merrill offers a student-run pottery co-op, the only college that does so. Students can throw, fire, and glaze their pieces in the workshop space; membership is open to Merrill students on a first-come, first-served basis.

The physical facilities of Merrill College were provided through a partnership of public funds and gifts from the Charles E. Merrill Trust and the family of Ming Ong, a student in the 1980s.

For more information, visit the Merrill College website or call (831) 459-2144.

Merrill College Fellows and Staff

Merrill College faculty fellows are listed here.
Merill College staff are listed here.

Porter College

Porter College was founded in 1969 as the fifth of UC Santa Cruz’s residential colleges and was later renamed in honor of a generous grant from the Porter-Sesnon family. Its mission is to foster achievement in all areas of study. Porter is especially dedicated to achievement in the arts, believing that creative inquiry is an essential part of a rigorous and broad-minded education, a flourishing society, and a happy life.

Academic Emphases

The Porter campus is the administrative home of the Arts Division and the History of Art and Visual Culture Department, but Porter College faculty fellows hail from every academic division on campus and from many non-academic professions. All of them share the philosophy of education that the college’s curriculum embodies: first, discover how to learn; then, learn by doing; and finally, let your learning make a difference in the world.

The Porter College curriculum encourages students to explore unusual topics and provocative ideas, to test and revise hypotheses about the meaning of their experiences, to learn from the failures that are an inevitable part of new learning and discovery, and to assume responsibility for the decisions they make in their studies.

Porter 80A and 80B, known as “Porter Core,” provide rigorous training in critical reading and writing and study skills. Students meet with instructors in seminars and in small writing groups. Those who are admitted as transfer students are exempt from the core course requirement but may opt to enroll in Porter Core if resources permit it. Lower-division transfer students who have not completed at least one UC-transferable college English composition course with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or better, prior to enrollment, are permitted to take the core course to satisfy the C1 requirement.

In addition to the core course, Porter offers a variety of smaller interdisciplinary seminars that combine historical and theoretical approaches to the arts, humanities, and sciences with practical experience conducting scholarly research and making creative work.

The college provides fellowship funds each year to talented students pursuing original research and creative projects.

College Community and Facilities

The traditional residence halls and apartments play an important role in bringing the college community together. Students are encouraged to spend their beginning years in residence in the college, where housing is available for 1,300 students. The residence halls are divided into smaller units, with from 30 to 35 students sharing common lounges and other facilities. Theme halls include Film and Digital Media, Social Justice, and LGBTIQ. Students also have a choice of quiet, same gender, or substance-free halls. The six-person apartments are reserved for upper-division students.

Porter College is also home to the Transfer Community at Porter, a transfer student living/learning community. All on-campus incoming transfer students reside at Porter regardless of their college affiliation. Special programs are designed to help new transfer students adapt to life at UCSC.

In addition to traditional classrooms, Porter has many specialized facilities, such as student art galleries, a study center, and a dining hall that converts to a theater space. The Arts Instructional Computing Laboratories, located at Porter College, consist of two high-end labs oriented toward the arts.

Porter provides constructive opportunities for relaxation and recreation to balance the intellectual demands of a university education. The Residential Life and Activities Office staffs organize formal and informal events, including open-mic nights, dances, recreational activities, and the mural painting program.

Many students and faculty perform or exhibit their work at Porter. The Sesnon Gallery, the Porter/Kresge Dining Hall, the Quad, and the faculty gallery host a wide range of artistic, cultural, and academic events each year.

Porter College facilities were constructed through a partnership of public funds and a gift from the Porter-Sesnon family of Santa Cruz. Part of the gift was used to establish an endowment for the college. For more information, call (831) 459-2273 or visit the Porter College website.

Porter College Fellows and Staff

Porter College faculty fellows are listed here.
Porter College staff are listed here.

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Kresge College

Kresge was the sixth college to be built on the UCSC campus. The college was founded on the principle of participatory democracy as a means of encouraging a strong sense of community. Our motto is Independence, Creativity, Community.

Academic Emphases

Kresge’s academic life emphasizes courses that encourage community and self-determination. This principle is exemplified in a series of courses that emphasize participatory learning, hands-on experience, and courses of study that transcend the walls of traditional classrooms. Ranging from agroecology to collaborative public education, from music to photography, from writers' workshops to practical activism, from natural history to community design, Kresge Labs offer new ways for Kresge students to fulfill GE requirements while broadening their educational experience in the company of UCSC's most dedicated and imaginative faculty.

Kresge’s core course 80, Power and Representation, is a writing class that explores the relationships between individuals and their communities. Our goal is to empower individuals to think beyond easy answers, to express themselves clearly, to feel at home in writing, and to feel powerful in representing themselves on the page. In Power and Representation, we examine the many ways we constitute ourselves (and are constituted) as individuals in relation to communities. First, we study ideas about representation as a theoretical grounding, and then focus on representations of nationality, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, and race in critical theory, film, fiction, theater, and nonfiction. Our purpose is to create a dialogue about ourselves and our relationship to our communities as it is, as it might be, and as we might help make it.

In addition to section meetings, on Thursday nights, all students come together to watch core-related films or performers or listen to lectures.

Lower-division transfer students who, prior to enrolling, have not completed at least one UC-transferable college English composition course with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or better are permitted to take the core course to satisfy the C1 (composition) requirement. Students who, in the Analytical Writing Placement Exam (AWPE), received a score of five or lower take a two-quarter version of the core class, designed to increase competency in college-level writing

In addition to the core course, Kresge offers a series of courses that offer students the opportunity to study in small groups. Kresge has offered courses in journalism, comic writing, documentary film, gardening, and service learning.

Kresge is home to the Writing Center, including the Creative Writing archives, and also offers the following opportunities:

  • The Common Ground Center promotes social and environmental change through undergraduate-focused action-education, research, advocacy, and civic engagement.

  • Transformative Action and Service Learning classes prepare students to become innovators in real-life community projects.

  • The Kresge Garden is the site of our organic gardening and food systems classes, where students empower themselves by learning how to grow their own food and work together cooperatively.

Residential Life

The architecturally renowned Kresge campus offers apartments rather than residence halls.

The Kresge apartments attract students with a sense of independence and community participation. Distinctively designed, the apartments at Kresge Proper are configured for five to nine people. Kitchen and living areas look out onto the street, with other rooms facing the surrounding redwood forest. J and K Building’s three-person apartments are reserved for continuing upper-division students. These two-bedroom apartments have an efficiency-style kitchen and living area.

Kresge is home to the Writer’s House, a living/learning community for students interested in creative writing and journalism (regardless of major), and the Ecovillage, a community for students who want to actively create a new world based on cooperation and sustainable living.

The Residential Life and College Programs staff at Kresge work to bring students of similar interests together academically and socially by designing fun and unique programs based on student interest. Programs that focus on celebrating the diversity of the residential community, on multicultural community building, and on enhancing academic success through music events, mural painting, and food-centered events are highlighted.

Community Life

A wide variety of events and activities shape community life at Kresge, lectures, workshops, dances, and concerts are a regular part of student life at the college. The nature and tenor of these events are a reflection of the diverse interests of students and staff, who are committed to providing voice and opportunity for all community members.

Students actively shape the college community through participation in Kresge Parliament, an openly structured student organization responsible for voting the allocation of all college membership fees in support of activities and events. Parliament and Town Meetings also serve as a forum for the discussion of college and campuswide issues with college staff and faculty. Additionally, students can get involved in the Kresge Multicultural Education Committee (KMEC), Music Co-op, Food Co-op, Photo Co-op, or the Kresge Garden.

Transfer Students

In recognition of the wealth of diversity that transfer students bring to the community—in terms of culture and experience—Kresge is the home of the STARS program (Services for Transfer and Re-entry Students). This is a staffed facility where students can gather to relax, socialize, hold meetings, and obtain campus information and resource support in a central location regardless of college affiliation. The resource center offers workshops, social evenings, and special events tailored to meet the needs of transfer students.

STARS also offers special advising workshops and two- and three-credit courses designed to help transfers in the process of entering the university and moving forward in their careers.

Facilities

At the entrance to the college is the restful Piazzetta, with a beautiful, architecturally designed fountain, and the Kresge Garden, the largest student-run garden on campus. Leading off from the Piazzetta are STARS, the Commuter Lounge, and a student lounge equipped with television and DVD player. In addition to STARS, as a unique facility on the campus, the Commuter Lounge is a place for off-campus students who want to use a kitchen, shower, or lockers while on campus. Kresge’s Photo Lab Co-op is above the Piazzetta and offers 24-hour accessibility to darkroom equipment. Adjacent to the nearby meadow is an outdoor basketball court. The college includes a study center with soaring ceilings and walls of glass overlooking the forest, which also houses a writing center, a computer lab equipped with PCs for student use, and a student-run Food Co-op, where organic produce is sold and working memberships are available. At the top of the college are the Town Hall, the Music Co-op, and the Owl’s Nest Cafe.

For more information, call (831) 459-2071 or visit the Kresge College website.

Kresge College Fellows and Faculty

Kresge College faculty fellows are listed here.
Kresge College staff are listed here.

Oakes College

Oakes was founded in 1972 to provide high-quality education to students from diverse cultural and social backgrounds. Students, staff, and faculty associated with the college believe that learning takes place not only in the classroom, but also in residential settings. For that reason, they work hard to create a multicultural community whose members strive to achieve ambitious goals—including equal access to educational opportunity and freedom from oppression—while simultaneously affirming and celebrating their distinctive cultural backgrounds.

Academic Emphases

The Oakes College faculty represents a wealth of expertise from the natural sciences to the humanities, and we are proud to have some of the top scholars in the world among our faculty fellows. Our students major in nearly every discipline at UCSC—from economics and computer science, to theater arts and Latin American and Latino studies—and they are well supported by the depth and breadth of the Oakes College faculty and the extensive knowledge of our advising team. Oakes graduates have gone on to successful careers in fields such as medicine, law, education, medical research, and community service.

The Oakes core course, Communicating Diversity for a Just Society, is required of Oakes students. Most students take the course in their first year. The course is writing intensive and examines individual and collective responses to issues of culture, gender, sexuality, race, and class. Those who are admitted as transfer students are exempt from the core course requirement but may take the core course at their option pending available space; lower-division transfer students who, prior to enrolling, have not completed at least one UC-transferable college English composition course with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or better are permitted to take the core course to satisfy the C1 or C2 requirement.

At Oakes College, we are committed to fostering student engagement and leadership within and beyond the classroom. To this end, we encourage students to develop the knowledge, skills, and cross-cultural understanding necessary to become active citizens and future leaders in their own communities, workplaces, and academic disciplines as well as in the larger U.S. society and the world as a whole. We also provide a range of resources and programs that will enable all students to succeed in their academic endeavors. Such resources include:
  • The Learning Center and the Westside Writing Center at Oakes College provide space for study groups as well as tutoring and advising programs. Special assistance in writing and tutoring in a variety of subjects is offered to Oakes students and EOP students.

  • The Oakes Computer Lab provides access to 20 PCs for Oakes students.

  • Co-curricular programs like Oakes 4.0, Oakes Core Café, and the residential Science Community at Oakes College all offer living-learning opportunities to enhance student success and to provide students with unique opportunities for interacting with faculty in small group contexts.

  • Community-based Advocacy and Research for Action (CARA), the Oakes Service Learning and Community Justice Program, brings together rigorous academic work with significant and meaningful service learning. CARA engages students in collaborative problem-solving on some of the most pressing problems of our time, focusing on language, literacy, and education, Oakes 76 (Social Geography and Justice in Santa Cruz), is offered each winter. Oakes 151A and 151B (Community Literacies seminar and Field Study supporting the Corre la Voz after-school program) are offered each quarter by application only; Oakes 152 (Transformative Literacies) and Oakes 153 (Community Mapping) are offered in alternate years.

  • Student services at Oakes include academic advising and psychological counseling.

College Community and Facilities

Oakes College, located on the west side of the UCSC campus, commands a sweeping view of Monterey Bay. Students may choose between apartment and residence hall living. The residence halls have attractive courtyards, and views of the ocean and the city of Santa Cruz. Students can also share an apartment-style living space, which includes a common living area and small kitchen. All students participate in a University Meal Plan. Full-time coordinators for residential education and neighborhood assistants help residents develop cooperative ways of living together. As one student put it, “Oakes is a community where people of many different backgrounds, interests, and goals form a friendly neighborhood. We share our cultures and adapt to the different lifestyles of our neighbors.” The residential program is designed to assist all students in integrating their academic and social needs. The residential staff host activities sponsored through its wellness, academic success, leadership, and social justice and diversity committees.

The college staff seek to nurture and sustain a community in which mutual respect, understanding, and concern for others are the norm. Within that atmosphere of community expectations, students are also supported and encouraged to find room for their own creative personal expression.

The other facilities at Oakes further support the special programs of the college and provide recreational opportunities for the students. College facilities include the Learning Center, a multipurpose room for lectures, movies, and small theater productions; a college library; a quiet space for individual study, and a dining facility shared with Rachel Carson College. Adjacent to the Oakes Café is the Guzman Room, a social and group study space. Oakes is also home to the Underdome, a small outdoor basketball court great for friendly three-on-three competition. Additional recreational facilities located close to the college include tennis courts, a large recreational field, and an indoor basketball court.

Oakes is named after Roscoe and Margaret Oakes in recognition of their generous philanthropy through the San Francisco Foundation.

For further information, call (831) 459-2558 or visit the Oakes College website.

Oakes College Fellows and Staff

Oakes College faculty fellows are listed here.
Oakes College staff are listed here.

Rachel Carson College

Rachel Carson College is dedicated to Environment and Society, and the college has organized a vigorous intellectual life around this theme. The college examines environmental issues from multiple perspectives, through the social and natural sciences, engineering, public policy, and science and technology studies. Rachel Carson College offers students a sense of community and opportunities to augment academic work with a wide range of extracurricular activities. These include events such as Earth Week, sustainability internships, and a minor in Sustainability Studies.

Rachel Carson College students major in nearly every discipline offered at UCSC, while sharing a strong commitment to environmental stewardship. We teach our students and graduates to become environmentally aware green citizens, with the capacity to evaluate sustainability policies and strategies and with the skills needed for hands-on engagement in the many projects and activities that will be required to ensure the future of the planet and human civilization.

Academic Emphases

Rachel Carson College sponsors a number of educational initiatives aimed at furthering its theme and mission. A three-quarter core course, Nurturing Environmental Citizenship, is taught by senior faculty from the departments of politics, ecology and evolutionary biology, Earth and planetary sciences, and electrical engineering. The fall-quarter course is mandatory for all incoming freshmen, with the goal of introducing students to environmental issues—past, present, and future—as they manifest in California. The winter-quarter course addresses the principles of environmental science, while the spring quarter course examines how technological innovation and engineering can address environmental challenges. In addition, practicum internships, a three-quarter course on the tools of sustainability work, and the sustainability studies minor all enable students to acquire skills that they can apply to the coming green economy and to take on service-learning work with campus and community-based agencies and organizations. Additional college courses include garden internships, filmmaking for Santa Cruz TV (SCTV) and the student journal Gaia, student-led classes in sustainability, a class on peregrine falcons, and a seminar on environment in film.

College Community and Facilities

Rachel Carson College is located on a sunny, terraced hillside on the west side of the UCSC campus, offering a spectacular view of Monterey Bay and the coastline as well as the redwood-covered hills. The college is designed to encourage interaction among resident and commuter students, with outdoor spaces for relaxing and informal opportunities to socialize. These include small residence hall patios, grass quadrangles, and a large plaza—the heart of the college—where pedestrian traffic converges. Adjacent to the college are recreational facilities that include the West Field House, tennis courts, basketball and sand volleyball courts, and playing fields. The Theater Arts and Music Centers, McHenry Library, and Porter and Oakes Colleges are a short walk from the college. Other parts of the university are easily accessible by foot, bicycle or frequent shuttle buses.

Rachel Carson College’s facilities include an academic building that accommodates the college and faculty offices, the Sociology Department, associated research centers, classrooms, and a computer lab with printers. Approximately 500 students live in the college’s community of two-and three-story residence halls, which provide single, double, and triple rooms as well as suites. The residence halls include laundry facilities and lobbies that serve as living rooms—favorite places where residents gather to relax, watch television, and catch up on the news of the day. A number of these are themed residences that focus on special programming related to the respective theme. Another 300 students are housed in Rachel Carson College’s two-, three-, and four-bedroom apartments.

The college’s residential staff includes both coordinators for residential education, who are full-time live-in professionals, and undergraduate resident assistants. The residential staff plans a variety of educational and recreational events, including community barbecues, outdoor movies, and student-initiated events that celebrate the diversity of our community. More intimate gatherings include study breaks, coffee talks, and potlucks. The residential staff is available to ease the transition to college life, making the college a comfortable new home for our residents.

The Student Commons building contains the office of Rachel Carson College’s college programs coordinator, the office of the Student Environmental Center, and a large meeting room for student use. A study center is located across the plaza. The Rachel Carson College Café is a favorite haven and gathering place for students, faculty, staff, and other members of the campus community.

In conjunction with the student government and student organizations, the Rachel Carson College Student Programs Office plans social, multicultural, and educational events for the college community. Weekly Café Nights—featuring open mics, music, art shows, and guest speakers—accommodate the diverse spectra of cultural and artistic interests of the students. College Night, a quarterly cultural event, provides an opportunity for students to learn about a variety of cultures through entertainment, education, and delicious cuisine. In addition, the Student Programs Office works closely with the Student Environmental Center to bring programs that educate and build long-lasting networks, which aim to address the environmental issues affecting our world today.

Above all, Rachel Carson College seeks to create a community of inclusion, in which each person is encouraged to share and explore beliefs, worldviews, values, and ideas in an atmosphere of mutual support and trust.

For more information, contact the college at (831) 459-2361, email 8housing@ucsc.edu, or visit the the Rachel Carson College website.

Rachel Carson College Fellows and Staff

Rachel Carson College faculty fellows are listed here.
Rachel Carson College staff are listed here.

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College Nine

“From climate change to inequality, the commonality of problems facing all of the planet’s inhabitants requires an understanding of our growing interconnections and interdependencies. In College Nine, we challenge students to grapple with complex, controversial and multi-scalar issues, for which there exist vastly differing opinions about the nature of problems and how to solve them. Becoming a global citizen requires critical thinking, cultural awareness, and effective communication, all skills our training provides to our students.”

—Flora Lu, College Nine Provost

Academic Emphases

College Nine’s theme of International and Global Perspectives emphasizes the causes and consequences of our increasingly interconnected world. Our academic and co-curricular programs analyze economic and cultural globalization, immigration, ethnic conflicts, genocide, and human rights, among other issues. Students interested in these issues either as their major focus or as part of their general education are invited to join the College Nine community.

Writing Seminar

In the first-quarter frosh course, Introduction to University Discourse: International and Global Issues, students examine current issues pertinent to the college’s intellectual theme. Topics address issues such as globalization, inequities in wealth and poverty across the world, human rights, and regional conflicts.

The seminar emphasizes the development of students’ reading comprehension and oral and written communication skills. Students write several reflective and analytical papers during the quarter. Each paper undergoes at least one revision after the student receives constructive feedback from the instructor and peers. Thus, the instructors work closely with each student throughout the quarter.

All students who enter as frosh are required to pass the college writing seminar with a grade of C (2.0) or better. Those who are admitted as transfer students are exempt from the core course requirement but may take the core course at their option pending available space; lower-division transfer students who, prior to enrolling, have not completed at least one UC-transferable college English composition course with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or better are permitted to take the core course to satisfy the C1 requirement.

Special Academic and Co-curricular Programs

Optional programs are available to involve College Nine students in academic and co-curricular activities beyond the first-quarter course. They are designed to promote students’ academic achievement and success by connecting them with faculty mentors and helping them pursue leadership experiences in particular contexts.

Global Action

In this workshop facilitated by peer instructors, students learn about current international and global issues through interactive exercises, small group discussions, and faculty presentations. Students will develop an “action plan” to raise awareness about one or more of these concerns and take practical steps to create positive change in the world.

Service Learning: Esprit de Corps (110 and 110B), Praxis, and Alternative Spring Break

Students extend their learning beyond the classroom by gaining practical experience volunteering for a school or a nonprofit organization in the Santa Cruz community. Examples include assisting in a classroom or at a homeless shelter. College Nine has its own service-learning class, Esprit de Corps (110 and 110B), taught by our service-learning coordinator. Students meet weekly to reflect on their experiences, discuss readings, and listen to speakers from the community. To complete the service experience, students develop a final paper or project related to civic engagement. The class is available all three quarters and is facilitated by students during the winter and spring. Praxis, College Nine’s community-service organization, provides another way to serve the Santa Cruz community. Praxis students meet weekly and volunteer on the weekends at a variety of locations. Over the spring break students can participate in an Alternative Spring Break Project and earn credit at the same time. Students join forces with local community activists by immersing themselves in the issues and solutions of this multifaceted region of Santa Cruz County.

Students as Teachers and Mentors

College Nine students have special opportunities to become course assistants, tutors, and student mentors for course credit. Students gain independent experience as teachers leading their own discussion sections of a College Nine course. They receive close supervision that emphasizes a collaborative approach to developing and enhancing teaching, communication, and leadership skills. The College Nine academic advisers can also direct students to other opportunities for student teaching and peer-mentoring programs on campus. These are excellent opportunities to work closely with a faculty member and to develop one’s own skills as a teacher and a leader.

Practical Activism: Tools for Local and Global Change

The annual Practical Activism Conference is a daylong, student-led event featuring keynote speakers, ten workshops, various on- and off-campus organizations, performances, and a variety of hands-on activism activities. Students gain valuable leadership and organizing skills through developing and planning this exceptional program, which involves collaboration among faculty, staff, and the local community. Visit practicalactivism.ucsc.edu for more information.

Education Abroad

The UC Education Abroad Program places students at a university in another country for one or more quarters. Studying abroad can be a valuable way to expand ones understanding of the world. Given the international focus at College Nine, students are encouraged (but not required) to develop a second language or to study abroad.

Research Opportunities

The faculty at UC Santa Cruz are highly ranked for the quality of their research. College Nine students are encouraged to take advantage of the many excellent opportunities available to work closely with faculty as research apprentices. Students will find many internship, independent study, or senior thesis programs in the departments of most majors. The College Nine academic advisers will help link students with these programs.

College Nine Pathways to Distinction

Another feature of College Nine is that qualified students may graduate with College Nine Distinction. This recognition is intended to serve as an incentive for students to pursue activities that are especially apt to help them succeed in college and beyond. Two pathways are possible:

  • Research and Scholarship. In this pathway, students pursue research with faculty by completing three quarters (15 credits) of work on a senior thesis or a research internship. Students may be recognized with College Nine Distinction if they do a thesis or a research internship in their major on a topic related to international or global issues.

  • Language and Culture. Students who enroll in at least three quarters (15 credits) in either Education Abroad or a foreign language (or a combination) may qualify for College Nine Distinction.

College Community

Founded in 2000, College Nine is one of the newest colleges at UCSC. College Nine creates an integrated living and learning environment through engaging academic and extracurricular programs focusing on the theme of International and Global Perspectives. Students and staff collaborate to develop an array of programs exploring the many aspects of the college’s theme. Some of the programs include faculty presentations, guest speakers, debates, films, arts events, and interactive workshops. These programs unite community members in an atmosphere of mutual respect, in which important contemporary and controversial issues are discussed.

College Nights

College Nights are community programs that feature a special dinner menu, entertainment, and activities that relate to the college theme of International and Global Perspectives. College Nights provide an opportunity to gather as a community several times a quarter to enjoy a meal and share conversations. Planned by students and staff, past College Nights have focused on Earth Day and sustainability, music and dance from around the world, and the global influence of American popular culture. College Nights are held in the Dining Commons and are open to all College Nine students, staff, and faculty.

Student Government

The College Nine Student Senate serves as the student government for College Nine and represents its students to the college and campus administrations and to the Student Union Assembly (SUA), the campuswide student governance board. The Senate appoints students to campus and college committees, consults with college administration on policy development, and provides monetary support to student organizations.

International Living Center

The International Living Center (ILC) at College Nine offers a unique living environment fostering understanding, cooperation, and friendship among upper-division students from different nations, cultures, and backgrounds. Half of the residents are students from the United States, and the other half are students from various countries around the world. Students reside in the Colleges Nine and Ten Apartments. Based out of the International Living Center, the International Affairs Group (IAG) offers all Colleges Nine and Ten community members the opportunity to engage in lively discussions about important current international issues with one another through guest speakers, film, literature, media, and personal experience.

iFloor

The iFloor is a residence hall floor made up of a mix of international first-year students and U.S. first-year students who apply to live in this intentional intercultural community housed within the College Nine. This unique community offers residents opportunities to make meaningful, lifelong friendships and connections that extend beyond borders.

Think Global; Act Local

Think Global; Act Local is College Nine’s living-learning community for students who wish to practice the components of service learning. Students living on this floor will have the opportunity to gain knowledge and understanding of important social justice issues occurring in Santa Cruz and in the world at large. Students participate in local service projects several times per quarter and take the time to reflect individually and as a group upon their actions.

Co-curricular Programs and Opportunities

Getting involved in co-curricular activities is a predictor of college success. Not only do college activities help students make friends, they foster leadership and group cooperation skills. There are many opportunities at College Nine for student involvement. These include the following groups as well as many other programs, activities, and clubs.

Global Leadership Development (GLAD)

GLAD meets weekly throughout the fall quarter and provides a wide range of exercises, guest speakers, and programs designed to foster and develop participants’ efficacy as world citizens and leaders of College Nine.

CREATE

CREATE (Cultural Resources to Educate and to Empower) offers a community at College Nine for students of color to find support and empowerment through mentorship and friendship.

Praxis (Student Volunteer Community)

Praxis is an organization geared toward community building and social justice. By participating in Praxis, students gain exposure to a variety of Santa Cruz community agencies and explore what it means to be agents of social change.

Intercultural Community Weekend

This two-day retreat provides international and U.S. students from diverse backgrounds the opportunity to explore various components of intercultural communication. Through a series of structured exercises and small-group discussions, students share perspectives on intercultural issues, values orientation, and cross-cultural communication. The goal of the workshop is to build community and friendship between international and U.S. students as well as to increase students’ understanding of the complexity of communicating across cultures.

Physical Surroundings

College Nine is situated in a redwood grove next to the Social Sciences 1 and 2 Buildings near the heart of campus. One of the campus’s Instructional Computing Labs is conveniently located in the Social Sciences 1 Building. A nature preserve serves as College Nine’s “backyard.” College Nine students have immediate access to hiking, running, and mountain bike trails in the adjacent forest.

Residence halls offer approximately 590 single and triple bedrooms. These fully furnished residence halls include adjacent student lounges, recreational spaces, and Internet connections. In addition, there is a state-of-the-art dining hall with an adjoining multipurpose room and recreation lounge for both College Nine and College Ten.

College Nine and College Ten also house approximately 400 upper-division students in apartments, with single, double, and triple bedrooms. All apartments have full kitchens, living rooms, bathrooms, and Internet connections. Ground-floor apartments have decks, and most upper apartments have private balconies.

For more information about academic or general college programs, call (831) 459-5034, email jhartman@ucsc.edu or visit the College Nine website.

College Nine Fellows and Staff

College Nine faculty fellows are listed here.
College Nine staff are listed here.

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College Ten

“At College Ten, we strive toward the goals of analyzing, embodying, and implementing ideas that move individuals and society toward a practice of the principle that all people possess equal intrinsic worth.”

—Flora Lu, College Ten Provost

Academic Emphases

College Ten’s theme of Social Justice and Community addresses a range of social problems and their impact on society. In particular, the academic and co-curricular programs consider the injustices that many people confront in their lives and possible policies for addressing social, political, and economic inequalities. In addition, the college provides students with opportunities to make their own positive contributions to social change through community involvement or scholarly research.

The college curriculum explores the causes and consequences of social injustice in several ways. Students examine the roots of prejudice, discrimination, and violence directed toward groups based on their ethnicity, skin color, gender, sexual orientation, religious beliefs, or political views. They also consider the causes and consequences of economic inequality both within the United States and around the world.

Writing Seminar

In the first-quarter frosh course, Introduction to University Discourse: Social Justice and Community, students examine current issues pertinent to the college’s intellectual theme. Students explore issues such as poverty, discrimination, and economic injustice and the role of communities, governments, and corporations in addressing such societal inequities.

The seminar emphasizes the development of students’ reading comprehension and oral and written communication skills. Students write several reflective and analytical papers during the quarter. Each paper undergoes at least one revision after the student receives constructive feedback from the instructor and peers. Thus, the instructors work closely with each student throughout the quarter.

All students who enter as frosh are required to pass the college writing seminar with a grade of C (2.0) or better. Those who are admitted as transfer students are exempt from the core course requirement but may choose to take the core course pending available space; lower-division transfer students who, prior to enrolling, have not completed at least one UC-transferable college English composition course with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or better are permitted to take the core course to satisfy the C1 requirement.

Special Academic and Co-curricular Programs

Optional programs are available to involve College Ten students in academic and co-curricular activities beyond the first-quarter core course. They are designed to promote students’ academic achievement and success by connecting them with faculty mentors and helping them pursue leadership experiences in particular contexts.

Social Justice Issues Workshop

College Ten students have the option of enrolling in the Social Justice Issues Workshop in winter quarter. This two-credit course meets once per week and can be taken in addition to a regular 15-credit academic load. The workshop offers a small, dynamic learning community in which members explore important issues of personal and cultural identity; social, political, and environmental concerns; and community-mindedness. The class emphasizes small-group experiential learning through structured exercises and group activities, and also includes discussions, film presentations, and guest speakers.

Service Learning: Esprit de Corps (110 and 110B), Praxis, and Alternative Spring Break

Students can extend their learning beyond the classroom by gaining practical experience volunteering for a school or nonprofit in the Santa Cruz community for credit. Examples include assisting in a classroom or at a homeless shelter. College Ten has its own service-learning class, Esprit de Corps (110 and 110B), taught by our service-learning coordinator. Students meet weekly to reflect on their experiences, discuss readings, and listen to speakers from the community. To complete the service experience, students develop a final project related to civic engagement. The class is available all three quarters and is facilitated by students during the winter and spring. Praxis, College Ten’s community-service organization, provides another way to serve the Santa Cruz community. Praxis students meet weekly and volunteer on the weekends at a variety of locations. Over the spring break students can participate in an Alternative Spring Break Project and earn credit at the same time. Students join forces with local community activists by immersing themselves in the issues and solutions of this multifaceted region of Santa Cruz County.

Practical Activism: Tools for Local and Global Change

The annual Practical Activism Conference is a daylong, student-led event featuring keynote speakers, 10 workshops, various on-and off-campus organizations, performances, and a variety of hands-on activism activities. Students gain valuable leadership and organizing skills through developing and planning this exceptional program, which involves collaboration among faculty, staff, and the local community. Visit practicalactivism.org for more information.

Students as Teachers and Mentors

College Ten students have special opportunities to become course assistants, tutors, and student mentors for course credit. Students gain independent experience as teachers leading their own discussion sections of a College Ten course. They receive close supervision that emphasizes a collaborative approach to developing and enhancing teaching, communication, and leadership skills. The College Ten academic advisers can also direct students to other opportunities for student teaching and peer-mentoring programs on campus. These are excellent opportunities to work closely with a faculty member and to develop one’s own skills as a teacher and a leader.

Research Opportunities

The faculty at UC Santa Cruz are highly ranked for the quality of their research. College Ten students are encouraged to take advantage of the many excellent opportunities available to work closely with faculty as research apprentices. Students will find many internship, independent study, or senior thesis programs in the departments of most majors. The College Ten academic advising teams (including preceptor and provost) will help link students with these programs.

College Ten Pathways to Distinction

Students are recognized with College Ten Distinction upon successful completion of three quarters (15 credits) of experiential coursework in Service and Leadership and/or Research and Scholarship focused on social justice and diversity issues. Applicable courses in service-learning and research opportunities with faculty can fulfill the criteria for distinction. This recognition is intended to serve as an incentive for students to pursue activities that are apt to help them succeed in college and beyond.

College Community

Founded in 2002, College Ten is the newest college at UCSC. College Ten creates an integrated living-and-learning environment through engaging academic and extracurricular programs focusing on the theme of Social Justice and Community. Students and staff collaborate to develop an array of programs exploring the many aspects of social justice. Some of the programs include faculty presentations, guest speakers, debates, films, arts events, and interactive workshops. These programs unite community members in an atmosphere of mutual respect, in which contemporary and controversial issues are discussed.

College Nights

College Nights are community programs that feature a special dinner menu, entertainment, and activities that relate to the college theme of Social Justice and Community. College Nights provide an opportunity to gather as a community several times a quarter to enjoy a meal and share conversations. Planned by students and staff, past College Nights have focused on Earth Day and sustainability, music and dance from around the world, and the global influence of American popular culture. College Nights are held in the Dining Commons and open to all College Ten students, staff, and faculty.

Student Government

The College Ten Student Senate serves as the student government for College Ten and represents its students to the college and campus administrations and to the Student Union Assembly (SUA), the campus wide governance board. The Senate appoints students to campus and college committees, consults with college administration on policy development, and provides monetary support to student organizations.

Rumi’s Field

Named after a renowned peace-seeking Sufi poet, Rumi’s Field offers a space for students who wish to learn, live and interact, using the skills of Nonviolent Communication and exploring social justice through the lens of nonviolence. Nonviolent Communication (NVC) strengthens one’s ability to inspire empathy from others and respond compassionately even under difficult circumstances. This mixed community of College Ten first-year and continuing students will offer the opportunity to engage in dialog and resolve conflict using NVC consciousness as a tool for personal and societal transformation.

Co-curricular Programs and Opportunities

Getting involved in co-curricular activities is a predictor of college success. Not only do college activities help students make friends, they foster leadership and group cooperation skills. There are many opportunities at College Ten for student involvement. These include the following groups as well as many other programs, activities, and clubs.

CREATE

CREATE (Cultural Resources to Educate and to Empower) offers a community at College Nine for students of color to find support and empowerment through mentorship and friendship.

ENGAGE

ENGAGE (Explore New Growth and Gain Experience) offers students the opportunity to explore and develop their own beliefs, values, and feelings about current issues and social concerns. Students gain leadership skills through collaborating on a community action project, and develop relationships and experience to become leaders in the College Ten community. ENGAGE meets weekly throughout fall quarter.

Multicultural Community Weekend

This two-day retreat provides students from diverse backgrounds the opportunity to explore aspects of social justice, diversity, and community through a series of exercises and discussions (both structured and informal). Participants explore issues impacting our individual identities (e.g., race, class, gender, sexual orientation, ability, religion), increase their understanding of the complexities of communicating across diverse experiences and backgrounds, build communication skills, and share in celebrating and deconstructing the diversity of our community. Students apply for this opportunity in the fall.

Terry Freitas Café

Located at College Ten, the Terry Freitas Café is a student-run lounge with a long legacy as a favorite gathering place among students. It is open daily for social justice performances, music, and social interaction. Café student baristas serve coffee and various snacks for a small donation. The café is named after former UCSC student Terry Freitas, who dedicated his life to making the world a more socially just place.

Physical Surroundings

College Ten is situated in a redwood grove next to the Social Sciences 1 and 2 Buildings near the heart of campus. One of the campus’s Instructional Computing Labs is conveniently located in Social Sciences 1. A nature preserve serves as College Ten’s “backyard.” College Ten students have immediate access to hiking, running, and mountain bike trails in the adjacent forest. Residence halls offer approximately 600 single and triple bedrooms. These fully furnished residence halls include student lounges, recreational spaces, and Internet connections. In addition, there is a state-of-the-art dining hall with an adjoining game room and Freitas Café, a coffee lounge for both Colleges Nine and Ten. Colleges Ten and Nine also house approximately 400 upper-division students in apartments, with single, double, and triple bedrooms. All apartments have full kitchens, living rooms, bathrooms, and Internet connections. Ground-floor apartments have decks, and most upper apartments have private balconies.

For more information about academic or general college programs, call (831) 459-5034, email lschachl@ucsc.edu or visit the College Ten website.

College Ten Fellows and Staff

College Ten faculty fellows are listed here.
College Ten staff are listed here.

Revised 09/01/16

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Mountain View, CA 94040